• Selecting Courses
      The Henry County School Board supports the use of best practices that research and experience have shown to be effective for high school aged students. Such practices include, but are not limited to, teacher-directed instruction, group work, cooperative learning, peer tutoring, and student-directed learning. The high school offers a minimum of six and one-half hours of instruction each day, exclusive of the lunch period. Classes are arranged in a 4x4 block format schedule. All students will maintain a full day schedule of classes.

       The following pages describe high school course offerings. Course selection patterns may affect course offerings. Students registered for a class with an enrollment too small or too large are notified by the school counselor and given the opportunity to make another course selection.

       

      Reading Foundations—1 elective credit (Prerequisite: None)
      This course introduces students to literacy skills needed to succeed at the secondary level and beyond. Students learn how to read the text structure of fiction and non-fiction and how to demystify the reading process in order to grasp its content. Students will learn organizational, study and test-taking skills essential to higher education. Teacher directed instruction will focus on comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and text structure.

      English 9 – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 8 English)
      Students will use multimodal tools to create presentations both independently and in small groups.  Students will expand vocabulary using the structural analysis of roots and affixes to understand complex words. In fiction texts, students will apply knowledge of literary terms and analyze a variety of genres. Students will make inferences and draw conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence in nonfiction texts. Students will use the recursive writing process while writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on analysis and persuasion. They will produce arguments in writing that demonstrate knowledgeable judgments and address counterclaims. Students will be expected to have greater control over the conventions of writing.

      English 10 – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 9 English)
      Students will continue to use multimodal tools to create presentations both independently and in small groups. Students will continue the development of vocabulary, with attention to connotations, idioms, classical allusions, and figurative language. There is a sustained emphasis on reading comprehension by comparing fiction and nonfiction texts. Students will use the recursive writing process while writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on analysis and persuasion. They will produce arguments in writing that demonstrate knowledgeable judgments and address counterclaims. Students will be expected to have greater control over the conventions of writing and write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and postsecondary education. Students will apply research techniques to analyze information gathered from diverse sources, evaluate the validity and authenticity of sources, and apply research techniques to quote, summarize, paraphrase, and embed findings.

      English 11 – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 10 English)
      Students will create media messages and analyze the cause-and-effect relationships between mass media coverage and public opinion trends. Students will create persuasive, multimodal presentations that address alternative perspectives. Students will continue the development of vocabulary. Students will examine and analyze fiction texts by American authors describing the contributions of other cultures and identifying prevalent themes and characterizations, which are reflective of American history and culture. Students will continue to develop as writers using the recursive writing process while writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on persuasion and argumentation. Students will be expected to have greater control over the conventions of writing and write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and postsecondary education. Students will apply research techniques to synthesize information from primary and secondary sources to produce a research product. Students will take the EOC Reading SOL Test.          

      English 12 – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 11 English)
      Students will create persuasive/argumentative, multimodal presentations both independently and in collaborative groups. Students will continue the development of vocabulary, with attention to connotations, idioms, classical allusions, and figurative language. Students will examine and analyze fiction texts by British authors, evaluating how authors use key elements to contribute to meaning and interpreting how themes are connected across texts. Students will use the recursive writing process while writing in a variety of forms with an emphasis on persuasion and argumentation. Students will be expected to have greater control over the conventions of writing and write and revise to a standard acceptable both in the workplace and in postsecondary education. Students will apply research techniques to synthesize information to produce a research product.

      Research Methodology and Design—1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 10 English)
      This course is an introduction to the research process, which includes research design, sampling techniques, elementary statistical analysis, library research, scientific writing, presentation skills, and development of multimedia presentations.  All students will complete the preliminary report of an original research project.  Students will design the study, collect and analyze data, and report the results.

      DE/AP English Language and Composition – 1 credit (Student must also register for Pre AP English 11 and have a qualifying score on the VPT)
      This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.  Upon completion of the course, students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam.

      DE/AP English Literature and Composition —1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 11 English and a qualifying score on the VPT)
      DE/AP English Literature and Composition is the equivalent of a college freshman English course. It offers advanced language studies and provides opportunities to practice a variety of rhetorical modes through assignment of frequent essays. Students read certain works of British, American, and world literature, and complete follow-up assignments requiring application of advanced techniques of literary analysis. A documented research paper and an oral presentation are required. A DE/AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Advanced Composition or DE/AP English Language Composition are recommended prerequisites for this course. Upon completion of the course, students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam.

      Advanced Composition – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Grade 10 English)
      Advanced Composition is designed especially for college-bound students to develop their composition skills in the areas of expository, descriptive, and narrative writing. The course includes an in-depth study of the four major modes of writing. Emphasis is placed on improving both the content and mechanics of writing. The course of study includes the mechanics of composition, analysis of selections, and development of a critical vocabulary.

      Creative Writing – 1 elective credit (Prerequisite:  None)
      This course offers students the opportunity to learn to write short stories, poetry, and one-act plays. Attention will be given to ideas, structure, and style. Some class time will be devoted to actual writing and criticism of student work. Opportunities will be given for students to submit their best work to various creative writing competitions.

      Journalism I – 1 elective credit (Prerequisite:  None)
      This course introduces students to all types of writing for the media, closely following formats established in the professional press. The class emphasizes writing, design, layout, and web-based publishing.

      Journalism II – IV – 1 elective credit each (Prerequisite:  Successful Completion of Journalism I and each succeeding course)
      These courses cover all facets of a journalist’s craft: reporting, writing, design, graphics, photography, broadcast, and multimedia. Contact with professional area journalist accompanies instruction and provides career information. Students produce the school’s newspaper using various computer applications and graphic design strategies. Students read and critique metropolitan and high school newspapers and discuss related works.

      Photo Journalism I – 1 elective credit (Prerequisite:  None)
      This course includes a study of the principles of layout, photography, copy and caption writing, and editing. As students work toward publication of the school’s yearbook, they will develop skills in yearbook design, use of technology, time management, and public relations.

      Photo Journalism II – V – 1 elective credit each (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Photo Journalism I and each succeeding course)
      This course will provide continued study in all phases of yearbook publication while placing increased emphasis on students’ leadership skills, staff organization, and advanced yearbook design.

      Public Speaking & Presentation—1 elective credit (Prerequisite:  None)
      This course will provide all levels of students the proper habits and techniques of public speaking. Students will create and organize speeches for a variety of occasions such as formal scholastic presentations, best man/ maid of honor speeches, impromptu, and award acceptances. Students will demonstrate the value of identifying their audience and dealing with the forms of interference one encounters when delivering a speech. This course will support students in developing their public speaking skills to gain confidence and overcome nervousness and stage fright, as well as providing experienced students with the tools to be an exemplary speaker. The skills students develop in this course are transferable across all disciplines.