• Agriculture

    Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    This is a yearlong course that is offered as a split block with Horticulture. This course is designed to develop competencies in each of the career pathways as they pertain to agricultural education, including the areas of Virginia’s agriculture industry; the global scope of agriculture; scientific research concepts in plant, animal, and food science; principles of leadership and opportunities within student organization [FFA]; agribusiness and Supervised Agricultural Experience program opportunities; agricultural skills and safety; forestry and wildlife; and natural resources and environmental systems.

    Introduction to Animal Systems –1 credit (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    Students develop competencies in each of the major areas of the   Animal Systems career pathway including animal nutrition, reproduction, breeding, care, and management. Students learn agricultural mechanics applicable to animal systems. Students will be exposed to principles of leadership and opportunities within student organization [FFA] along with Supervised Agricultural Experience opportunities.

    Agricultural Production Technology – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    This course emphasizes one or more areas of plant science, animal science, soil science, agricultural business management, and agricultural mechanization, based upon the student’s employment objective. Supervised occupational experience programs and leadership training are important parts of the course.

    Livestock Production Management – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    This course includes instruction in agricultural mechanics, with emphasis placed on the application of mechanical skills to farm power and machinery, soil and water management, supervised farming programs, and leadership training [FFA].

    Agricultural Business Management—1 credit Prerequisite: Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    This course teaches students the economics of raising meat animals for food production. Students will obtain animals through special low interest student loans for the government’s Farm Service Agency. They will learn fundamental animal husbandry skills, record keeping, and business management. Activities include resume preparation, portfolio design, study of international agriculture and participation in the FFA.

    Veterinary Science—2 credits (Prerequisites: Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    This course provides students with the employability and technical skills needed to succeed in postsecondary education and a career in veterinary medicine or in a related occupation. Course content will include the integration of academics and career skills and instruction in the use of tools, equipment, and facilities for veterinary medicine. Business management, leadership and FFA activities are included in the course. Students enrolled in the course should have a strong back-ground in math and science and knowledge of small animal care. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Equine Science – 2 creditd (Prerequisite: Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources or Introduction to Animal Systems)
    In this course, students learn how to care for and manage horses. Equine health, nutrition, management, reproduction, training, evaluation, and showmanship are the major instructional areas. In addition, course content includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for equine enterprises. Business management topics include the economics of boarding, training, and merchandising horses. Leadership development activities are included, and participation in FFA activities is encouraged. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Introduction to Natural Resources and Ecology Systems– 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    This course serves as the introductory level course for the Natural Resources Career Pathway. Students will explore the study of natural resources and begin to develop skills and knowledge required for employment in occupations related to forestry, wildlife and natural resources management, and conservation. Special emphasis is placed on opportunities in the FFA.

    Forestry Management – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and Intro to Natural Resources and Ecology Systems)
    This course will offer students instruction in the management of the forest as a resource and as a business. Students will develop knowledge in areas like tree physiology, forest ecology, silviculture, and the management and marketing of forest products. Strong emphasis is placed on developing career skills for the forestry industry as well as are continued opportunities available through FFA.

    Small Animal Care I — (Prerequisite:  Foundations of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources)
    Students learn how to care for and manage small animals, focusing on instructional areas in animal health, nutrition, management, reproduction, evaluation, training, and, when applicable, showmanship. Course content also includes instruction in the tools, equipment, and facilities for small animal care, and provides activities to foster leadership development. FFA activities are included.

    Small Animal Care II —11/2 credits (Prerequisite:  Small Animal Care I)
    Students advance their skills in the care and management of small animals, focusing on the specific needs of various breeds.  Instruction includes grooming and handling animals, as well as technical functions related to animal health, office-management instruction and it affords students the opportunity to practice leadership skills.  FFA activities are included.

    Horticulture

    Applied Horticultural Science – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    This is a yearlong course that is offered as a split block with Agriculture. This allows students to view the seasonal production and marketing of greenhouse and floral products. Course content covers basic plant science and an introduction to floral design, greenhouse production and landscape design. Plant identification includes greenhouse and landscape materials.

    Floral Design I – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science)
    This course offers an expanded study of floral design that began in Applied Horticultural Science. Specific design styles examined include body flowers, bud vases, balloon bouquets and decorations, mass arrangements, line-mass arrangements, silk Christmas design, and wedding design. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in herbaceous plant materials.

    Floral Design II – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science and Floral Design I)
    Course content covers a range of specialty floral design including historical and contemporary design, party decorations, floragraphy, dried arrangements and sympathy work. The business aspect of the industry is addressed through the study of pricing, advertising, shop display and design. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in herbaceous plant materials.

    Introduction to Floral Design— (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticulture Science plus any other Horticulture Class)
    This class incorporates skills required for composition of basic table arrangements. It includes the history of design styles, identification of flowers and greens, identification and use of equipment, and condition of handling flowers.

    Landscape Design, Construction and Maintenance I – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science)
    Landscape Design principles are studied. Hardscapes and plant materials are examined for their function in the landscape. Basic maintenance procedures on a residential landscape are introduced. Elementary drafting skills are practiced as features of a residential landscape design. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in woody materials.

    Landscape Design, Construction and Maintenance II – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science and Landscape Design, Construction and Maintenance I)
    Complete residential and commercial landscape plans are developed incorporating principles of landscape design, hardscapes and plant materials. Maintenance plans for landscape designs are developed. Special elements of the landscape such as golf courses, water features, and irrigation systems are examined. Computer landscape design graphics are practiced. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in woody materials.

    Landscape Drawing Applications— (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticulture Science plus any other Horticulture class)
    Students enrolled in this course apply theories of landscape design and drawing to actual design projects and tasks.  Emphasizes drawing techniques and use of advanced media in applications.  Includes hard line, free-style, and computer assisted landscape drawing in simple landscape drawing applications.

    Plant Production and Management – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science and Landscape Design, Construction and Maintenance I)
    Greenhouse structures are examined and compared for commercial applications. Environmental systems for greenhouses including irrigation, heating, cooling, fertilization, and photoperiodic control are studied. Greenhouse crop schedules for poinsettias, bedding plants, bulbs, and specialty crops are introduced. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in herbaceous materials.

    Specialty Horticulture Arts – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science and Landscape Design, Construction and Maintenance I)
    A wide range of specialty topics are studied including topiary, fruit and vegetable production, interior landscaping, terrariums, dish gardens, and bonsai. Horticulture as an opportunity for entrepreneurship is examined. Plant identification curriculum includes advanced placement work in woody plant materials.

    Advanced Plant Horticulture Articulation – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Applied Horticultural Science)
    The Henry County Horticulture Program is one of eight in the state of Virginia that has signed an articulation agreement with Virginia Tech. Students have an opportunity to earn up to nine semester credits. These credits will transfer to Virginia Tech’s Agriculture Technology program. If a student transfers from the two-year Agriculture program to a four-year Horticulture degree program, these credits would be accepted. Advanced Placement course work includes Herbaceous Perennials and Woody Landscape Plant Materials.

    Business and Information Technology

    Accounting – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    Accounting students study the basic principles, concepts, and practices of the accounting cycle for a service business and a merchandising business. Topics covered include analyzing transactions, journalizing and posting entries, preparing payroll records and financial statements, and managing cash control systems. Business ethics and professional conduct are emphasized. Students learn fundamental accounting procedures, using both manual and electronic systems.

    Advanced Accounting – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Accounting)
    Advanced Accounting students gain knowledge of advanced accounting principles, procedures, and techniques used to solve business problems and make financial decisions. Students work in a technology-integrated environment, using accounting and spreadsheet software to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and interpret business financial data related to inventory, fixed assets, notes/accounts payable and receivable, implementation of a partnership and a corporation, and other specialized accounting systems. Using authentic workplace scenarios that reflect current industry trends and standards, students analyze financial data and acquire knowledge of business ethics.

    Business Management - 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    Business Management students study basic management concepts and leadership styles as they explore business ownership, planning, operations, marketing, finance, economics, communications, the global marketplace, and human relations. Quality concepts, project management, problem solving, and ethical decision making are an integral part of the course. Student leadership skills may be enhanced by participation in school-based or virtual enterprises, job shadowing, internships, and/or the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA).

    Computer Information Systems – 1 credit
    Computer Information Systems students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through word processing, spreadsheets, databases, multimedia presentations, and integrated software activities. Students work individually and in groups to explore computer concepts, operating systems, networks, telecommunications, and emerging technologies. Completion of this course may prepare students for the certification exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS).

    Advanced Computer Information Systems – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Computer Information Systems)
    Advanced Computer Information Systems students apply problem-solving skills to real-life situations through advanced integrated software applications, including printed, electronic, and Web publications. Students work individually and in groups to explore advanced computer maintenance activities, Web site development, programming, networking, emerging technology, and employability skills. Completion of this course may prepare students for the certification exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS).

    Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies – 1 credit
    Design, Multimedia, and Web Technologies students develop proficiency in designing and creating desktop-published projects, multimedia presentations/projects, and Web sites.  Students apply principles of layout and design in completing projects. Students create portfolios that include a résumé and a variety of desktop-published, multimedia, and Web-site projects produced in the course.  Completion of this course may prepare student for the certification exam for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS).

    Cybersecurity/IT Fundamentals – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    Cybersecurity affects every individual, organization, and nation. This course introduces the essential technical and professional skills required for students to pursue programs leading to professional careers and IT certifications. It focuses on the evolving all-pervasive technological environment with an emphasis on securing personal, organizational, and national information. Students will be introduced to the principles of cybersecurity, exploring emerging technologies, examine threats and protective measures, and investigate the diverse high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand career opportunities in the field of cybersecurity. It prepares students for cybersecurity courses at the career academy during their junior and senior years.

    Cybersecurity in Manufacturing – 2 credits (Prerequisite: Cybersecurity/IT Fundamentals)
    This course will emphasize manufacturing systems, safety, materials, production, business concepts, and the manufacturing process. Students will learn the principles of cybersecurity, explore emerging technologies, and examine threats and protective measures. Students will participate in enterprise team activities to create products that demonstrate elements of business and manufacturing while demonstrating cybersecurity concepts and policies, including risk management. (2 Blocks at the Career Academy)

    Advanced Cybersecurity in Manufacturing- 2 credits (Prerequisite: Cybersecurity in Manufacturing)
    This course will continue to expose students to the revolutionary and growing field of cybersecurity as it relates to manufacturing.  Students will apply the principles of cybersecurity, research emerging technologies, analyze threat intelligence, and design protective measures. Students will participate in enterprise team activities to secure automated production processes while demonstrating cybersecurity concepts and policies. Upon completion, students will take an industry certification test.  (2 Blocks at the Career Academy)

    Junior ROTC

    Leadership Education and Training (LET I) – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    This course is designed to teach students the value of citizenship, leadership, service to the community, personal responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment, while instilling in them self-esteem, teamwork, and self-discipline. The course prepares students for responsible leadership roles while making them aware of their rights, responsibilities, and privileges as American citizens. Students receive instruction in citizenship skills, leadership theory and application, learning styles, communication skills, conflict resolution and financial planning. Students will be issued a uniform free of charge, and will be required to meet established grooming standards. They will also be required to participate in physical fitness training. Students can participate in JROTC co-curricular activities (Drill team, Air-Rifle Team, or Raider Team) if they maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.

    Leadership Education and Training (LET II) – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Successful completion of LET I)
    This course builds upon the citizenship and leadership skills learned in LET I. Students are afforded the opportunity to earn advanced rank in the JROTC unit, allowing them to lead others in practical application situations. Students receive instruction in achieving a healthy lifestyle, first aid for emergency and non-emergency situations, and drug awareness. Students also receive instruction in earth science, geography, and environmental awareness. Finally, students learn about the American political system, the U.S. Constitution, the shaping of American institutions and practices, the Bill of Rights, and citizen’s roles in American democracy. Students lead physical fitness training and can participate in JROTC co-curricular activities if they maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.

    Leadership Education and Training (LET III) – 1 credit (Prerequisite: LET I and LET II)
    This course builds upon the citizenship and leadership skills learned in LET II. Students advance to positions of increased responsibility leading other students in accomplishing a myriad of tasks. They receive instruction in mid-level management positions and leadership planning and strategies. Students learn skills to be successful in life such as becoming a better writer and speaker, managing anger, conflict resolution and mediation, violence prevention, time management and critical thinking strategies. They learn about career exploration strategies, developing portfolios, college preparation, and financial planning. Students lead physical fitness training and can participate in JROTC co-curricular activities if they maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.

    Leadership Education and Training (LET IV) - 1 credit (Prerequisite:  LET I, II, III)
    Students advance to positions of increased responsibility leading other students in accomplishing a myriad of tasks such as planning for the annual service-learning project. They receive instruction in the function and organizations within the Department of Defense, the Peace Corps, and AmeriCorps. Students are taught advanced leadership principles such as management skills, styles of leadership, communication and motivation. They learn teaching skills and are given the opportunity to teach LET I students. LET IV students are given the opportunity to complete citizenship and history projects. Students lead physical fitness training and can participate in JROTC co-curricular activities if they maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.

    Leadership Education and Training (LET V-VIII) 1 credit (Prerequisite: LET I, II, III, and IV)
    Students can advance to the highest positions within the JROTC unit and experience the duties and responsibilities of leaders and staff officers within a large organization. The students conduct all the planning that is required to run the JROTC unit and ensure successful execution of all tasks assigned. They receive advanced instruction in citizenship, leadership, life skills, wellness, fitness, first aid, geography and environmental awareness and American history and government. The LET V-VIII students lead physical fitness training and not only can participate in JROTC co-curricular activities but have the opportunity to be Captains or hold other advanced leadership positions within the various teams if they maintain a 2.0 GPA.

    Introduction to Game Design & Development – 1 credit (Prerequisite: None)

    This course is an introductory overview of video game design and development and the fundamentals of the game industry. Topics include a brief history of video games, the elements that define a video game, content creation strategies, the design and development process, industry professions, and game design and development techniques. Game design and development involves the creation of video games, a topic residing primarily in the domain of computer science, with some coverage of digital arts. Students will design and develop their own original games by using MIT’s free Scratch web application and Unity, free software that is used widely by game industry professionals. Students of all backgrounds are encouraged to take Intro to Game Design and Development. Students will understand the value of diversity in the video game industry and will gain a strong foundation to pursue further study in game design, game development, or related studies in computer science or digital arts. This course will be offered online only through Virtual Virginia.

    Family and Consumer Sciences

    Introduction to Culinary Arts – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    The food occupations competencies focus on identifying and exploring the individual careers within the food service industry. Units of study include food science and technology, dietetics and nutrition services, contemporary cuisines and service styles, food and beverage production and preparation, and food safety and sanitation. Teachers reinforce math, science, social studies and English Standards of Learning while teaching the required competencies.  Teachers also focus on workplace readiness skills.

    Culinary Arts I – 2 credits (Prerequisite:  None)
    Students practice managerial, production, and service skills used in government, commercial, or independently owned institutional food establishments and related food industry occupations. Students plan, select, store, purchase, prepare, and serve food and food products. They study basic nutrition, sanitation, and food safety; the use and care of commercial equipment; and the operation of institutional food establishments. Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and entrepreneurship opportunities within the field of culinary arts are emphasized. Teachers highlight the basic skills of mathematics, science, and communication when appropriate in content.  Introduction to Culinary Arts is a recommended prerequisite for this course.

    Culinary Arts II – 2 credits (Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts I)
    Culinary Arts II provides students an opportunity to refine skills in serving, dining room management, and other skills learned in Culinary Arts I. Students prepare for occupations such as chef/cook, baker/pastry helper, pastry decorator, hospitality worker, dietetic aide/assistant, food demonstrator, and entrepreneur. Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and entrepreneurship opportunities within the field of culinary arts are emphasized. Teachers highlight the basic skills of mathematics, science, and communication when appropriate in content.

    Culinary Arts Specialization III – 2 credits (Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts II)
    Culinary Arts III provides students with an opportunity to enhance their skills in planning menus, applying nutritional principles, implementing sanitation and safety standards, and exploring careers. Depending on the locality, students have the prospect of specializing in one of the following food-preparation techniques: Baking and Pastry, Catering/Banquet, Restaurant/Business, or Quantity Foods. Critical thinking, practical problem solving, and entrepreneurial opportunities within the field of culinary arts are emphasized.

    Nutrition and Wellness – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    Students enrolled in Nutrition and Wellness focus on making choices that promote wellness and good health; analyzing relationships between psychological and social needs and food choices; choosing foods that promote wellness; obtaining and storing food for self and family; preparing and serving nutritious meals and snacks; selecting and using equipment for food preparation; and identifying strategies to promote optimal nutrition and wellness of society. Teachers reinforce math, science, social studies and English Standards of Learning while teaching the required competencies.  Teachers also focus on workplace readiness skills.

    Intro to Teachers for Tomorrow – 1 credit   This course fosters student interest, understanding, and appreciation of the teaching profession and allows students an introduction to careers in education. Students are taught to develop self-awareness, collaborate and communicate with peers, build positive learning environments, and discover learning differences of others. The curriculum is designed to help students set attainable goals in the Education and Training Career Cluster. This course introduces students to the high school Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow (VTfT) program.

    Teachers for Tomorrow – 1 credit (Prerequisite: Intro to Teachers for Tomorrow)

    Virginia Teachers for Tomorrow (VTfT) fosters student interest, understanding, and appreciation of the teaching profession and allows students to explore careers in education. Students build a foundation for teaching; learn the history, structure and governance of teaching; apply professional teaching techniques in the VTfT classroom and field experience; and reflect on their teaching experiences.

    Teachers for Tomorrow II – 1 credit (Prerequisite: Intro to Teachers for Tomorrow I)

    Students continue to explore careers in the Education and Training Career Cluster and pathways. This course provides the opportunity for students to prepare for careers in education as they research postsecondary options, learn about the process of teacher certification in Virginia, and participate in a practicum experience.

    Entrepreneurship – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    This course introduces students to the concept that an entrepreneur is an individual who undertakes the creation, organization, ownership, and risk of a business. Students will acquire information to guide business decision making and understand fundamental economic concepts to obtain a foundation for employment in business. Upon completion of this course, students will also demonstrate an understanding of business ownership, financial statements, marketing principles and basic economic principles.  Students will develop sales and customer service skills.

    Health and Medical Science

    Introduction to Health and Medical Sciences–1 credit (Prerequisite: None)
    This course introduces the student to all health care careers and develops basic skills common to all health occupations.  Throughout the course, instruction emphasizes safety, cleanliness, asepsis, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency within the health care environment.  In addition, instruction may include the basics of medical laboratory procedures, pharmacology fundamentals, biotechnology concepts and communication skills essential for providing quality patient care.

    Medical Terminology – 1 credit (Prerequisite – None– Introduction to Health and Medical Sciences is recommended)
    Medical Terminology is designed to help students learn common medical terms essential for safe patient care. Topics are presented in logical order, beginning with each body system's anatomy and physiology and progressing through pathology, laboratory tests and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and pharmacology. Students learn concepts, terms, and abbreviations for each topic.

    Health Assisting A – 1 credit (Prerequisite – None– Introduction to Health and Medical Sciences is strongly recommended)
    Students explore careers in the allied health field by developing basic skills common to several assisting careers.  They study body structure and function, principles of health, microbes and disease, and an overview of the national health and patient care system.  Supervised work education, job shadowing and/or internships opportunities will be available for students and is managed by the Health and Medical Sciences teacher. 

    Health Assisting B– 1 credit (Prerequisite – Health Assistant I-A)
    Health Assistant B is an occupational preparation course that emphasizes advanced skill training in areas such as catheter care, range of motion, care of the dying, and admission, transfer and discharge procedures.  Students learn disease and body systems as related to advanced clinical care of the acute medical-surgical patient, the chronically ill, and the elderly.  Job Shadowing and/or Internships opportunities will be available for students.

    Marketing

    Principles of Business and Marketing – 1 credit
    Students explore the roles of business and marketing in the free enterprise system and the global economy. They study how the American economy operates and prepare to make decisions as consumers, wage earners, and citizens.

    Marketing (Co-op Option) – 1 credit
    Students are introduced to functions and foundations involved in the marketing of goods, services, and ideas and achieve skills necessary for successful marketing employment. Students study risk management, selling, promotion, pricing, purchasing, marketing-information management, product/ service planning, distribution, and financing. Foundation skills include economics, human resources, and marketing and business necessary for success in marketing occupations. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content area are a part of this course. Students participating in the co-op option may earn one additional credit for a minimum of 280 hours worked.

    Advanced Marketing (Co-op Option) – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Marketing [Co-op Option])
    Students continue to gain knowledge of marketing functions and foundations as they relate to supervisory and management responsibilities and develop skills needed for advancement. They develop skills for supervisory positions and/or for continuing education in a marketing-related field. Academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course. Students participating in the co-op option may earn one additional credit for a minimum of 280 hours worked.

    Fashion Marketing (Co-op Option) – 1 credit
    In this specialized course, students gain basic knowledge of the apparel and accessories industry and skills necessary for successful employment in apparel businesses. Students develop general marketing skills necessary for successful employment in fashion marketing, general marketing skills applied to the apparel and accessories industry, and specialized skills unique to fashion marketing. Personal selling, sales distribution, market planning, and product/service technology as well as academic skills (mathematics, science, English, and history/social science) related to the content are a part of this course. Students participating in the co-op option may earn one additional credit for a minimum of 280 hours worked.

    Sports, Entertainment, & Recreation (Co-op Option) – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    Students develop skills in the areas of marketing analysis, event marketing, communication, and human relations, along with a thorough understanding of the sports, entertainment, and recreation industry and career options available. Students participating in the co-op option may earn one additional credit for a minimum of 280 hours worked.

    Trade and Industrial

    Building Management I – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  None)
    This course is designed to provide students with general building and grounds maintenance skills in carpentry, plumbing and pipefitting, and landscaping. Hotels, hospitals, schools, shopping malls, office complexes, manufacturing plants and other establishments use facility maintenance technicians to keep their buildings and grounds safe and in good repair. Students will learn to schedule, perform and document preventive maintenance tasks, conduct routine inspections, safely operate a variety of hand and power tools, read and interpret blueprints, and make use of repair manuals and catalogs to order and manage supplies.

    Building Management II A– 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Building Management I)
    This course is designed to provide students with general building and grounds maintenance skills in carpentry, plumbing and pipefitting, and landscaping. Hotels, hospitals, schools, shopping malls, office complexes, manufacturing plants and other establishments use facility maintenance technicians to keep their buildings and grounds safe and in good repair. Students will learn to schedule, perform and document preventive maintenance tasks, conduct routine inspections, safely operate a variety of hand and power tools, read and interpret blueprints, and make use of repair manuals and catalogs to order and manage supplies.

    Building Management II B – 1 credit (Prerequisite:  Building Management II)
    Students increase their skills in working with students with general building and grounds maintenance skills in carpentry, plumbing and pipefitting, and landscaping. Students will learn advanced skills in performing and documenting preventive maintenance tasks, conducting routine inspections and safely operating a variety of hand and power tools.

    Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration I – 2 credits per year
    This program provides students an introduction to HVAC system operation including safety, tool selection/usage, copper tubing procedures and refrigeration cycles. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration II – 2 credits per year (Prerequisite:  Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration I)
    This instructional program prepares students to install, repair, and maintain the operating conditions of heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Industrial Maintenance Technology I – 2 credits (Prerequisite:  None)
    This program provides students an introduction to maintenance procedures including safety, tool selection/usage and basic welding procedures. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Industrial Maintenance Technology II – 2 credits Prerequisite:  Industrial Maintenance Technology I)
    This course focuses on the adjustment, maintenance, part replacement, and repair of tools, equipment, and machines used in industry, including hydraulic and pneumatic systems. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Cosmetology I – 2 credits (Prerequisite:  None)
    Cosmetology is the study of hair, skin and nails, and their related care. Students study and prepare in a clinical lab setting, using mannequins and live models for manipulative skill practice. The program emphasizes safety and sanitation, communication, and management skills. Related areas of study include psychology, ethics, and presentation of a professional image. Competency completions prepare the student for the Virginia Board of Cosmetology licensing exam. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)

    Cosmetology II – 2 credits (Prerequisite: Cosmetology I)
    Cosmetology is the study of hair, skin and nails, and their related care. Students study and prepare in a clinical lab setting, using mannequins and live models for manipulative skill practice. The program emphasizes safety and sanitation, communication, and management skills. Related areas of study include psychology, ethics, and presentation of a professional image. Competency completions prepare the student for the Virginia Board of Cosmetology licensing exam. Students are required to take the Virginia Board of Cosmetology licensing exam. (2 blocks at the Career Academy)