• CTE Course Descriptions

    Patrick & Henry Community College offers several career specific programs that include Motorsports Technology, Criminal Justice, Welding, Nurse Aide, and Precision Machining.

    Enrollment in Dual Enrollment Classes is contingent upon a student having 2.0 overall GPA and acceptance in the course by the college. Course availability is based on the number of credentialed instructors and student enrollment.

     

    Motorsports Academy

    YEAR 1:

    AUT 111 Automotive Engines I:
    Presents analysis of power, cylinder condition, valves and bearings in the automotive engine to establish the present condition, repairs or adjustments. Part I of II.

    MTS 135 Sheet Metal Fabrication:
    Introduces sheet metal terminology, fabrication, and installation for covering structural framework of race cars. Provides project oriented, problem-based experiences with equipment and machinery used in the Motorsports Industry.

    AUT 112 Automotive Engines II:
    Presents analysis of power, cylinder condition, valves and bearings in the automotive engine to establish the present condition, repairs or adjustments. Part II of II.

    MTS 120 Introduction to Motorsports Technology:
    Introduces the student to a survey of the Motorsports Industry. Explores the student to a broad overview of the industry, terminology and technology associated with developing a competition racecar.

    YEAR 2:

    MTS 125: Motorsports Technology I:
    Introduces the student to the various systems of the racecar. Focuses on the inter-related functions and the theoretical concepts of the high performance race engine. Emphasizes hands-on skills with identification and installation of component parts of a race engine.

    MAC 161: Machine Shop Practices I:
    Introduces safety procedures, bench work, hand tools, precision measuring instruments, drill presses, cut-off saws, engine lathes, manual surface grinders, and milling machines.

    MTS 130: Motorsports Structural Technology:
    Introduces the student to the basic design and fabrication of a racecar. Develops skills for the use of the tools, equipment, and materials in the production of a racecar. Emphasizes safety, accuracy, and aesthetics of the racecar and the work environment.

    MTS 131: Motorsports Structural Technology II:
    Introduces the student to the design and fabrication of a roll cage. Develops skills in the use or tools, equipment, and materials selection to bend, form, and fabricate the primary structural safety component. Emphasizes NASCAR and other sanctioning bodies’ specifications.

     

    Criminal Justice Academy

    YEAR 1:

    ADJ 100 Survey of Criminal Justice:
    Presents an overview of the United States criminal justice system; introduces the major system components--law enforcement, judiciary, and corrections.

    ADJ 236 Principles of Criminal Investigation:
    Surveys the fundamentals of criminal investigation procedures and techniques. Examines crime scene search, collecting, handling and preserving of evidence.

    ADJ 105 The Juvenile Justice System:
    Presents the evolution, philosophy, structures and processes of the American juvenile delinquency system; surveys the right of juveniles, dispositional alternatives, rehabilitation methods and current trends.

    ADJ 237 Advanced Criminal Investigations:
    Introduces specialized tools and scientific aids used in criminal investigation. Applies investigative techniques to specific situations and preparation of trial evidence.

    YEAR 2:

    ADJ 133 Ethics and the Criminal Justice Professional:
    Examines ethical dilemmas pertaining to the criminal justice system, including those in policing, courts and corrections. Focuses on some of the specific ethical choices that must be made by the criminal justice professional.

    ADJ 130 Introduction to Criminal Law:
    Surveys the general principles of American criminal law, the elements of major crimes, and the basic steps of prosecution procedure.

    ADJ 111 Law Enforcement Organization and Administration I:
    Teaches the principles of organization and administration of law enforcement agencies. Studies the management of line operations, staff and auxiliary services, investigative and juvenile units. Introduces the concept of data processing; examines policies, procedures, rules, and regulations pertaining to crime prevention. Surveys concepts of protection of life and property, detection of offenses, and apprehension of offenders.

    ADJ 131 Legal Evidence:
    Surveys the identification, degrees, and admissibility of evidence for criminal prosecution; examines pre-trial and trial procedures as they pertain to the rules of evidence.

     

    Welding Academy

    Students will learn welding skills including utilizing oxyacetylene, ARC, Flux Core, and MIG welding. Students are required to commit two blocks to this program for both fall and spring semester.  Students have the opportunity to earn American Welding Society (AWS) certifications during the semester based on their skill development. Welding Academy courses are available to Seniors Only.

    WEL 120 – Introduction to Welding
    Introduces history of welding processes. Covers types of equipment, and assembly of units. Stresses welding procedures such as fusion, non-fusion, and cutting oxyacetylene. Introduces arc welding and plasma arc cutting. Emphasizes procedures in the use of tools and equipment.

    WEL 123 – Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Basic)
    Introduces history of welding processes. Covers types of equipment, and assembly of units. Stresses welding procedures such as fusion, non-fusion, and cutting oxyacetylene. Introduces arc welding and plasma arc cutting. Emphasizes procedures in the use of tools and equipment. 

    WEL 160 – Gas Metal Arc Welding
    Introduces semi-automatic welding processes with emphasis on practical application. Includes the study of filler wires, fluxes, and gases.

    WEL 161- Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW)
    Introduces flux cored semi-automatic welding processes with emphasis on practical application. Includes the study of filler wires, fluxes, and gases.

     

    Nurse Aide Curriculum  

    The purpose of this program is that it prepares a student for entry level practice in the health care field to provide patient care in a variety of health service facilities. Students who successfully complete the appropriate courses may be eligible for employment in hospitals, skilled/residential nursing facilities, home care, physician offices, or other health related facilities. After successful completion of the nurse aide courses, student will be eligible to apply to take the certification test for Certified Nurse Aide in Virginia. After successful completion of the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation course, student will receive American Heart Association Basic Life Support certification. A student who resides outside of Virginia and plans to apply for certification as a nurse aide subsequent to completion of this education program may not meet the requirements of certification for the student’s state of residence.

    The program prepares completers to demonstrate skillful delivery of patient care at the nurse aide level of preparation. Physical Requirement: The minimal functional requirements for all entering nurse aide students include:

    • sufficient eye-hand coordination and manual and finger dexterity to provide direct patient care and to manipulate and operate equipment in the delivery of patient care;
    • sufficient ability to fully observe patients/patient conditions and provide patient care, read patient health information, and observe and manipulate equipment, including in dimly lit environments;
    • sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and healthcare team members, including ability to recognize and report changes;
    • satisfactory communication skills, to include competence in reading, writing and speaking in English, in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings to allow for accurate recording and reporting of patient information;
    • ability to perform patient care activities that require full range of motion including handling, lifting, or moving patients and/or equipment;
    • ability to lift and carry items weighing up to 50 pounds;
    • ability to successfully perform all required duties and responsibilities in classroom, laboratory and clinical settings in stressful situations or conditions;

    Nurse Aide Students will be required to undergo mandatory drug screening and criminal background check. Students must have a negative drug screen and criminal background check to be eligible for clinical learning experiences. Students must earn a grade of C or higher in the nurse aide lecture, lab, and clinical courses (NUR 27 and NUR 21) in order to earn the career studies certificate. Clinical/field/preceptor experiences require access to contracted clinical agencies.

    Courses Required

    NUR 27  5 credits (lecture/lab) total instructional hours 60 Lecture/45 lab

    NUR 21 1 credit (clinical) includes 45 total hours

    HLT 105 1 credit CPR (this will only be needed if the students do not have AHA CPR from the high school).

    Participation Requirements:

    • Drug screening
    • Criminal background check
    • Uniform with closed toe/heel white shoe
    • Watch 
    • Physical examination and TB Skin Test
    • Textbook/Workbook
    • Certification examination
    • COVID Vaccine (Required by Medical Facility in which clinical hours take place)
    • Transportation to clinical agencies as required

     

    Precision Machining  

    The Precision Machine program will prepare and equip students for work in machine shop environments through the use of project based learning. Students will understand the correct use of and reading of precision measuring tools, reading and understanding blue prints, as well as job planning. The students will learn how to operate and maintain band saws, manual lathes, knee mills, as well as an introduction to CNC lathe programming and operation.

    YEAR 1:  

    MAC 161 – Machine Shop Practices I:
    Introduces safety procedures, bench work, hand tools, precision measuring instruments, drill presses, cut-off saws, engine lathes, manual surface grinders, and milling machines. 

    MAC 162 – Machine Shop Practices II:
    Introduces safety procedures, bench work, hand tools, precision measuring instruments, drill presses, cut-off saws, engine lathes, manual surface grinders, and milling machines.   

    MAC 163 – Machine Shop Practices III:
    Offers practice in the operation of the drill press, engine lathe, vertical milling machine, horizontal milling machine, and the surface grinder. Introduces practical heat treatment of directly hardenable steels commonly used in machine shops.   

    MAC 164 – Machine Shop Practices IV:
    Offers practice in the operation of the drill press, engine lathe, vertical milling machine, horizontal milling machine, and the surface grinder. Introduces practical heat treatment of directly hardenable steels commonly used in machine shops.   

    YEAR 2:  

    DRF 160 –  Machine Blueprint Reading:
    Introduces interpreting of various blueprints and working drawings. Applies basic principles and techniques such as visualization of an object, orthographic projection, technical sketching and drafting terminology.

    MAC 121 –  Numerical Control I:
    Focuses on numerical control techniques in metal forming and machine processes. Includes theory and practice in lathe and milling machine computer numerical control program writing, setup and operation. 

    MAC 126 –  Introductory CNC Programming:
    Introduces programming of computerized numerical control machines with hands-on programming and operation of CNC machines. 

    MAC 295 –  Topics in Precision Machining:
    Provides an opportunity to explore topical areas of interest to or needed by students.