• Students selected to attend The Piedmont Governor’s School for Mathematics, Science and Technology are enrolled for two years in a half-day program located at an off-site location provided by Patrick Henry Community College. Courses at Governor’s School earn a student dual enrollment credit and students have the opportunity to earn an Associates’ Degree in Science at the end of their senior year. Students interested in applying to Governor’s School should speak with a school counselor regarding their plan of study. It is recommended that students complete their third year of foreign language.

    Those interested in attending the Piedmont Governor’s School should contact a school counselor during the fall of their sophomore year to learn more about the requirements for admission. Admission to the Piedmont Governor’s School is highly competitive and students can apply during the spring semester of their sophomore year.  Selection criteria include PSAT scores, standardized test scores, and academic performance through tenth grade along with teacher recommendations.

    Students wishing to attend the Piedmont Governor’s School should meet the following criteria:

    • Possess a GPA of 3.2 or higher
    • Have completed Biology AND Algebra II by the end of his/her 10th grade year

    The Piedmont Governor’s School offers opportunities which will strengthen students in areas that will help them excel in college, a career, and life after high school. The curriculum at PGS is characterized by and contains the following:

    • Heavy research focus
    • Student and faculty collaboration
    • Completion of a digital portfolio
    • Program oriented field trips
    • Interdisciplinary units
    • Hands-on labs
    • Project based learning

    PGS Junior Course Descriptioins

    Juniors must take the following courses during their Junior year:              

    • Science: College Chemistry
    • Math: Precalculus with Trigonometry or Advanced Calculus I (based on PHCC Math Placement results)

    All Juniors are required to take Research Methodology and Design, Statistical Reasoning, and Information Technology course.

    Pre-Calculus w/ Trigonometry (MTH 167 -1 high school credit/5 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Algebra II)
    Presents topics in power, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, trigonometry, trigonometric applications, including Law of Sines and Cosines, and an introduction to conics.

    Advanced Calculus I – (MTH 263 1 high school credit/4 College semester hours/year)
    Presents concepts of limits, derivatives, differentiation of various types of functions and use of differentiation rules, application of differentiation, antiderivatives, integrals and applications of integration.

    College Chemistry - 1 high school credit/8 College semester hours/year
    The course explores the fundamental laws, theories, and mathematical concepts of chemistry.  Topics will include:  structure of matter, states of matter, reactions (types stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics) and descriptive chemistry.  There is an emphasis on the laboratory experience as a primary means for the development of chemical concepts.  Experimental design, gathering data, and the use of statistics to analyze data is studied jointly with the research methodology and design course or senior research application and evaluation.  The course will cover the Standards of learning for chemistry.  Students will take the End-of-Course test for the course at their base school.

    ITE 119 – Information Technology – 1 high school credit/3 College semester hours/year
    Presents the information literacy core competencies focusing on the use of information technology skills.  Skills and knowledge will be developed in database searching, computer applications, information security and privacy, and intellectual property issues

    Statistical Reasoning (MTH 155 – 1 high school credit/3 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Algebra II)
    Presents elementary statistical methods and concepts including visual data presentation, descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression.  Emphasis is placed on the development of statistical thinking, simulation, and the use of statistical software.

    Junior Research Methodology and Design – 1 high school credit/3 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite: None)
    The course is an introduction to the research process which includes research design, sampling techniques, elementary statistical analysis, library research, scientific writing, presentation skills, and development of multimedia presentations.  All students will complete the preliminary report of an original research project.  Students design the study, collect and analyze

    PGS Senior Course Description

    Seniors must take the following courses during their Senior year:

    • Science: Seniors can choose between Physics, Biology, or Human Anatomy
    • Math: Seniors can choose between Advanced Calculus I, Advanced Calculus II, or Statistics

    All seniors are required to take senior research application and evaluation course.

    College Physics-1 high school credit/8 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Advanced Mathematical Analysis)
    The course is an advanced curriculum that stresses development of problem solving, thinking and laboratory skills.  The content covers mechanics, thermodynamics, wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism, and selected topics in modern physics.  Classroom activities include collecting and analyzing data in a computer-based lab and introducing students to application of theoretical concepts.  Experimental design, gathering data, and the use of statistics to analyze data are studied jointly with the research methodology and design course or senior research application and evaluation.

    College Biology -1 high school credit/8 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Algebra II)
    This course is a college-level introduction focusing on the fundamental characteristics of living matter from the molecular level to the ecological community level.  Introduces the diversity of living organisms, their structure, function, and evolution.  Topics covered include major concepts in molecular and cellular biology, microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, botany, physiology, and ecology.

    Advanced Calculus I (MTH 263 - 1 high school credit/4 College semester hours/year)
    Presents concepts of limits, derivatives, differentiation of various types of functions and use of differentiation rules, application of differentiation, antiderivatives, integrals and applications of integration.

    Human Anatomy – 1 high school credit/ 8 college semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  College Chemistry)
    This course integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body.  Integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and pathology.

     Advanced Calculus II (MTH 264 - 1 high school credit/4 College semester hours/year)
    Continues the study of calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions including rectangular, polar, and parametric graphing, indefinite and definite integrals, methods of integration, and power series along with applications.  Designed for mathematical, physical, and engineering science programs.

    Statistics II (MTH 246 – 1 high school credit/3 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Advanced Mathematical Analysis)
    Continues the study of estimation and hypothesis testing with emphasis on advanced regressions topics, experimental design, analysis of variance, chi-square tests, and non-parametric methods.

    Statistics I (MTH 245 – 3 college semester hours/year (Co-requisite: Calculus II)
    Presents an overview of statistics, including descriptive statistics, elementary probability, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression.

    Senior Research Application and Evaluation – 1 high school credit/3 College semester hours/year (Prerequisite:  Research Methodology and Design)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to explore an area of personal interest that promotes the mission of the school.  Students take an active part in formulating the problems and the methods by which the problems are investigated.  Appropriate investigative techniques are utilized to produce or analyze raw data and/or produce original interpretations rather than rely exclusively on the conclusions of others.  When completing projects, students select from a wide range of alternative products and communicate their results to real, rather than a contrived audience in a professionally appropriate manner.  Students actively participate during their junior year in planning their senior research experience.