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BREADCRUMB

Triennial Assessment

Overview

Henry County Public Schools

2017-2020 Triennial Assessment 

Heart shaped bowl filled with fruits and vegetables

OVERVIEW & PURPOSE

 

 

In accordance with the Final Rule of the Federal Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010

and the Virginia Administrative Code: 8VAC20-740, Henry County Public Schools (HCPS) presents the 2017-2020 triennial report which includes the timeframe from August 2017 to June 2020. The Triennial Assessment indicates updates on the progress and implementation of Henry County’s Wellness Policy and wellness initiatives, and provides required documentation of actions, steps, and information as outlined in the Final Rule. The schools included in this assessment are: 

Elementary Schools

Secondary Schools

  • Axton Elementary School 
  • Fieldale-Collinsville Middle School 
  • Campbell Court Elementary School 
  • Laurel Park Middle School 
  • Drewry Mason Elementary School
  • Bassett High School 
  • G. W. Carver Elementary School
  • Magna Vista High School 
  • Meadow View Elementary School
  • Mt. Olivet Elementary School
  • Rich Acres Elementary School
  • Sanville Elementary School
  • Stanleytown Elementary School 


AUTHORITY & RESPONSIBILITY DESIGNEE(S)

The Director of School Nutrition, School Nurse Coordinator, and the Assistant Superintendent for Teaching and Learning are responsible for implementing and enforcing this policy. The Health & Physical Education Curriculum Coordinator also assists in the implementation of the Wellness Policy.  

The designated official for oversight is the Director of School Nutrition Programs, Mrs. Marci Lexa (phone: 276-638-1159, mail: 340 Ridgedale Drive, Martinsville, VA 24112; email: mlexa@henry.k12.va.us).  

WELLNESS POLICY

The Henry County Public Schools Wellness Policy (JHCF) includes all of the identified regulations outlined in the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 as well as important division-level expectations for our schools. The policy can be found on the HCPS website under School Board Meeting Agendas & Minutes and Policies. The Wellness Policy was

  • originally adopted on July 10, 2008 
  • reviewed & revised on January 2, 2020

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

WELLNESS POLICY UPDATES PROCESS

Our Wellness Committee consists of a diverse group of stakeholders that includes school employees, medical professionals, and community partners in a variety of fields. Because of the group’s focus and authority as a guiding/advisory body for the School Board, the overall process of policy updating and revision is maintained by this body. The public will be notified of Wellness Policy activities through announcements on the HCPS website as well as announcements shared via school messenger. 

ANNUAL COMMUNICATION OF WELLNESS POLICY 

In addition to our policy being available on the HCPS website, the policy is shared annually through the distribution of Student Planners, which include a section dedicated to HCPS policies. 

Description of Public Involvement 

Standard / Guideline

Met

Not Met

HCPS permits participation by the general public and the school community in the Wellness Policy process. This includes parents, students, and representatives of the School Food Authority, teachers of physical education, school health professionals, the School Board, and school administrators. 

-

Description of Public Updates  

Standard / Guideline

Met

Not Met

The Wellness Policy is made available to the public on an annual basis, at minimum. This includes any updates to and about the Wellness Policy. 

-

The Triennial Assessment, including progress toward meeting the goals of the policy, will be made available to the public on or before June 30, 2020. 

(one year waiver granted due to the COVID-19 pandemic) 

-

WELLNESS POLICY COMPLIANCE & PROGRESS  

Henry County Public Schools must conduct an assessment of the Wellness Policy every three years, at a minimum. The Final Rule requires State Agencies to assess compliance with the Wellness Policy requirements as a part of the general areas of the Administrative Review every three years. This initial assessment will act as our baseline and be used to look at future goals and opportunities for our schools both individually and collectively as a school division. 

HCPS used the School Level Report Card Tool for the Triennial Assessment provided by the VDOE to assess our progress. While the assessment does not address all aspects of a student’s well-being, it does align with the focus of the USDA’s Final Rule and regulations related to the Wellness Policy. An administrator at each building was responsible for completing the assessment for his/her school.

PROGRESS ASSESSMENT FOR IMPLEMENTATION 

The assessment data and other division data were used to assess the baseline progress of our Student Wellness Policy implementation. The main areas of our policy and the baseline data from the division level are provided below

WELLNESS POLICY LANGUAGE / GOALS

FULLY IN PLACE 

PARTIALLY IN PLACE 

NOT IN PLACE 

I. Nutrition Promotion & Education

Our school meets the specific goals for nutrition promotion and education as outlined in our Wellness Policy:

Students receive nutrition education that teaches the skills they need to adopt and maintain healthy eating behaviors.

-

-

Division health education curriculum standards and guidelines address both nutrition and physical education.

-

-

A qualified nutrition professional participates in the review of nutrition education materials.

-

-

Families receive educational information that encourages healthful eating and physical activity.

-

12/13 schools

-

Progress Statement:  Full compliance has been achieved with regard to nutrition education, division health education curriculum standards, and the review of nutrition education materials by a qualified nutrition professional. Students receive nutrition education through their health classes and also through daily interaction with cafeteria staff who encourage and guide students in selecting well-balanced and eligible meals. These practices reinforce healthy eating behaviors that will have a positive impact on students throughout their lives. In regard to division health education curriculum, HCPS follows the Health and Physical Education standards adopted by the VDOE. Health and Physical Education teachers frequently refer to and incorporate resources provided by the VDOE on the Health Smart Virginia website. 

12/13 schools are currently providing families with educational information that encourages healthful eating and physical activity. The Health and Physical Education Curriculum Coordinator will work with the Wellness Champion at each building to improve communication between schools and families moving forward. 

II. Physical Activity

Our school meets the specific goals for physical activity as outlined in our Wellness Policy:

Students receive regular age-appropriate quality physical education.  

-

-

Students are given opportunities for physical activity during the school day through physical education (PE) classes, daily recess periods for elementary school students and the integration of physical activity into the academic curriculum where appropriate.

-

-

Physical education programs provide age- appropriate skill development for all students, including those with special needs.

-

-

Schools encourage parents and guardians to support their children's participation in physical activity, to be physically active role models and to include physical activity in family events.

-

11/13 schools

-

Students are given opportunities for before and after-school programs including supervised age-appropriate physical activities that appeal to a variety of interests.

-

11/13 schools

-

 

Progress Statement: Full compliance has been achieved with regard to students receiving regular, age-appropriate, quality physical education, opportunities for physical activity during the school day, and physical education programs providing age-appropriate skill development for all students, including those with special needs. With the exception of time lost due to Covid-19 restrictions, elementary students regularly receive the required 100 minutes of physical activity per week (an average of 20 mins daily). Students in grades 6-12 have opportunities to receive the goal of at least 150 minutes per week on average during the regular school year. Per state guidelines, such programs may include any combination of (i) physical education classes, (ii) extracurricular athletics, (iii) recess, or (iv) other programs and physical activities deemed appropriate by the local school board. 

11/13 schools reported that they are currently providing resources that encourage parents to support their children’s participation in physical activity, to be physically active role models, and to include physical activity in family events. The Health & Physical Education Curriculum Coordinator for HCPS and the Wellness Champion at each building will work collaboratively to improve communication between schools and families moving forward. 

11/13 schools reported that students are given opportunities for before and after-school programs including supervised, age-appropriate physical activities that appeal to a variety of interests. Upon further investigation, it was determined that all schools, under normal operating conditions, provide students with opportunities to participate in a variety of after-school programs including walking/running clubs, programs offered through the YMCA and MHC After 3, school sports, marching band, etc. The two schools that responded “no” to this portion of the physical activity goal did so because the policy wording states “before and after-school programs.” Most schools do not offer programs prior to the start of the school day. Moving forward, the Wellness Committee will recommend a revision to the wording used in this section of the policy.  

III. Other School-Based Wellness Activities

Our school meets specific goals for other school-based activities that promote student wellness as outlined in our Wellness Policy:

An adequate amount of time is allowed for students to eat meals in adequate lunchroom facilities.

-

-

All children who participate in subsidized food programs are able to obtain food in a non- stigmatizing manner.

-

-

The availability of subsidized food programs is adequately publicized in ways designed to reach families eligible to participate in the programs.

-

-

Environmentally- friendly practices such as the use of locally grown and seasonal foods, school gardens and non disposable tableware have been considered and implemented where appropriate. 

-

-

Physical activities and/or nutrition services or programs designed to benefit staff health have been considered and, to the extent practical, implemented.

-

-

Progress Statement: Full compliance has been achieved with regard to all strands of our Other-School Based Wellness Activities goal. With the exception of Covid-19 restrictions, all students are provided with an adequate amount of time to eat meals in the lunchroom. All students receive breakfast and lunch at no charge to the child; therefore, all children receive their meals in a non-stigmatizing manner. Numerous communications are shared with parents to inform them of the free meals provided to their child(ren) during regular school days, during the pandemic, and during the summer months. School gardens are in place at some schools and other environmentally-friendly practices are implemented when/where appropriate. Regarding staff health, HCPS sends out monthly staff newsletters that include healthy recipes, recommendations for increasing physical activity, and tips for managing stress/maintaining overall wellness. HCPS as a whole and some individual schools have participated in initiatives that encourage weight loss/maintaining a healthy weight, increased physical activity, and/or self-care activities. At the school level, examples include Biggest Loser competitions, walking challenges, etc. At the district level, examples include March Madness (recommendations for a variety of wellness activities), Self-Care BINGO, and a two-year partnership with SOVAH Health of Martinsville to encourage achieving/maintaining a healthy weight.  

IV. Standards and Nutrition Guidelines for All Foods and Beverages Sold

Our school meets the standards and nutrition guidelines for all foods and beverages sold to students on the school campus during the school day that are consistent with federal and state regulations:

We follow federal school meal nutrition standards for all foods and beverages available for sale on campus during the school day.

-

-

We have adopted and implemented Smart Snacks nutrition standards for ALL items sold during school hours, including a la carte offerings and food sold in school stores and vending machines.

-

-

We follow Henry County Public School’s policy on exempt fundraisers as outlined in our Division’s Wellness Policy pursuant to current regulations § 22.1-207.4 of the Code of Virginia. 

Foods and beverages that meet or exceed the USDA Smart Snacks in Schools nutrition standards may be sold through fundraisers on the school campus during the school day. The District will make available to parents and teachers a list of healthy fundraising ideas from the Alliance for a Healthier Generation and the USDA. School Board Policy JHCH allows two (2) fundraisers per year during which food that does not meet the USDA Smart Snacks in Schools standards may be available for sale to students during the school day.

-Schools will use mainly non-food fundraisers, and encourage those promoting physical activity (such as walk-a-thons, Jump Rope for Heart, fun runs, etc.).

 -Fundraising during school hours will sell mainly non-food items or foods and beverages that meet the Smart Snacks nutrition standards.

-

-

Progress Statement: Full compliance has been achieved with regard to all strands related to the Standards and Nutrition Guidelines for All Foods and Beverages Sold. The Director of School Nutrition works diligently to ensure that all HCPS schools follow federal school meal nutrition standards for all foods and beverages available for sale on campus during the school day. The only food items available for purchase during the school day are sold through the school cafeteria, and all of those items adhere to the Smart Snacks nutrition standards. Vending machines are not operational during the school day. Additionally, school administrators and the Director of Finance are responsible for overseeing all school fundraisers to ensure that they meet or exceed the standards outlined in our policy. 

V. Standards for All Foods and Beverages Provided, But Not Sold

We follow Henry County Public School’s policy on standards for all foods and beverages provided, but not sold, as outlined in our Division’s Wellness Policy. 

Celebrations and Rewards

The School Board encourages parents, faculty and staff to cultivate lifelong healthy food choices among students by modeling healthy habits. Foods offered on the school campus for celebrations or rewards should meet the following guidelines:

-Classroom snacks brought by parents. If parents bring food for a child’s birthday or other occasion, the District asks that parents limit party items to small cupcakes, cookies or fruit purchased in a store and properly labeled with all ingredients and nutritional information.  Ingredient labels are required, as some students have food allergies.  The only acceptable drink item is water.  Other food and drink items are prohibited.  The District also asks that parents check with their child’s teacher to see when is the best time to bring special treats, as well as to bring enough for the entire class. Birthday parties are not recognized and should not interrupt the instructional program.

-Rewards and incentives. The District will provide teachers and other relevant school staff with a list of recommended ways to reward children. The use of foods and beverages as rewards should be limited, and food should never be withheld as punishment for any reason, such as for performance or behavior.

 

-

-

Progress Statement: All 13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. 

VI. Policy for Food and Beverage Marketing

All food and beverage marketing meets Smart Snacks nutrition standards.

-

-

Progress Statement: All 13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy.

VII. Progress

     Other activities that promote wellness 

Wellness activities were integrated across the entire school setting, not just in the cafeteria, other food and beverage venues and physical activity facilities.

-

-

Progress Statement: All 13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. Schools specifically referenced the use of Brain Breaks, Go Noodle, a variety of SEL activities, after-school activities such as running clubs, etc. 

Our school was encouraged to coordinate content across curricular areas that promote student health, such as teaching nutrition concepts in mathematics, with consultation provided by either the school or the District’s curriculum experts.

-

7/13 schools

-

Progress Statement: 7/13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. Those schools specifically cited PBL projects in the New Tech Academies, measurement lessons in math classes, collaborative lessons between Health & Physical Education teachers and Math/Science teachers, lessons presented by 4-H on nutrition, etc. 

Curriculum Coordinators will work with the schools not in compliance to increase cross-curricular lessons that promote health and wellness.  

When feasible, our District/School offered annual professional learning opportunities and resources for staff to increase knowledge and skills about promoting healthy behaviors in the classroom and school (e.g., increasing the use of kinesthetic teaching approaches or incorporating nutrition lessons into math class).

-

9/13 schools 

-

Progress Statement: 9/13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. Curriculum Coordinators and HCPS teachers have provided professional development (PD) related to brain breaks and the importance of incorporating physical activity in regular classrooms through optional sessions at our annual Teaching and Learning Conferences and through materials posted on HCPS’s Instructional Resources Canvas Page. Curriculum Coordinators will revisit this PD and work with school administrators to provide support as needed at each building. 

All school-sponsored events adhered to the wellness policy guidelines. All school-sponsored wellness events included physical activity and healthy eating opportunities when appropriate. 

-

8/13 schools 

-

Progress Statement: 8/13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. These schools reported only serving water and healthy snacks at school-sponsored events such as Family Nights. 

Of the schools that reported noncompliance, most stated they selected “no” because of the wording used in our policy (“all”). These schools stated that most events adhered to the wellness policy guidelines but probably not “all” events (i.e. pizza or cupcakes may be served occasionally). 

District level personnel will review healthier food and activity options that support the guidelines set forth in our wellness policy with all building level administrators. 

    Community Partnerships 

The District will enhance relationships with community partners in support of this wellness policy’s implementation.  Existing and new community partnerships and sponsorships will be evaluated to ensure that they are consistent with the wellness policy and its goals.

-

-

Progress Statement: The District maintains that we are fully compliant with this portion of our policy. Our community partners include 4-H, MHC After 3, the YMCA, Henry County Parks & Recreation, PYSL, Food Lion, SOVAH Health of Martinsville, MHC Coalition for Health & Wellness, and numerous local churches/faith-based organizations. 

    Community Health Promotion and Family Engagement 

Our District/School promoted to parents/caregivers, families, and the general community the benefits of and approaches for healthy eating and physical activity throughout the school year.

-

11/13 schools 

-

Progress Statement: 11/13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. The Health & Physical Education Curriculum Coordinator for HCPS and the Wellness Champion at each building will work collaboratively to improve communication between schools and families moving forward. 

Our District/School used electronic mechanisms (e.g., email or displaying notices on the district’s website), as well as non-electronic mechanisms, (e.g., newsletters, presentations to parents or sending information home to parents), to ensure that all families are notified of opportunities to participate in school-sponsored activities and receive information about health promotion efforts. 

-

-

Progress Statement: All 13 schools reported compliance with this portion of our policy. HCPS regularly shares announcements with families via School Messenger and/or announcements on the district’s webpage. Individual schools send home periodic newsletters and/or announcements to families as well.


 

DIVISION WELLNESS GOALS (2021-2024)

Henry County Public Schools will remain committed to our core goals of promoting nutrition education and encouraging physical activity for all students and staff. Additionally, HCPS has identified new division goals based on the identified opportunities from the progress assessment completed in 2020 and the requirements outlined in the federal regulations. 

Goals to be completed by the next triennial report (2023 - 2024):

Goal 1: All schools will designate one individual to serve as the Wellness Champion at the beginning of each academic year. The Wellness Champion will collaborate with school administrator(s), staff, students, families, and/or community partners to develop a minimum of one annual goal for his/her school. Goals should be designed so that forward movement is made based on the specific needs of the school. Goals should be aligned with our Wellness Policy, include best practices in school wellness, and focus on improving the overall wellness of students and staff. School goals should be in place by October of each school year. 

Goal 2: All schools will use the Healthy Schools Assessment provided by the Alliance for a Healthier Generation to establish and measure yearly goals specific to the needs of the school. The Healthy Schools Assessment will be completed by the school’s Wellness Champion and Administrator.

Goal 3: 80% of schools will be fully compliant with including healthy eating opportunities (when appropriate) and adhering to the wellness policy at all school sponsored events. Only items that meet the Smart Snacks in School Nutrition Standards will be served at school sponsored events where food/beverages are offered. 

Goal 4: 100% of schools will be fully compliant in regard to encouraging parents/guardians to support their children’s participation in physical activity, to be physically active role models, and to include physical activity in family events.  

Goal 5: All schools will use the data collected from the SEL screener to draft at least one SMARTGoal in relation to their Yearly School Improvement Plan.

QUALITY OF OUR HCPS WELLNESS POLICY 

To fulfill the federal requirement of assessing the quality of the wellness policy under the Final Rule, we used the WellSAT 3.0 tool, which measures the quality of written wellness policies including content comprehensiveness and strength of the policy language as it relates to the requirements under the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010. This assessment only recognizes items explicitly indicated in the policy and does not take into account common practices that are not identified or described in the policy. To learn more about the WellSAT 3.0, you may visit this website

An assessment of our policy, which was approved by the School Board in January 2020, was completed in May 2020 by members of the Wellness Committee. The findings of report can be viewed below:

Summary of School Wellness Policy Scores

WellSAT 3.0 Item 

Comprehensiveness Score

Strength Score 

Section 1: Nutrition Education

100

25

Section 2: Standards for USDA Child Nutrition Programs and School Meals

100

88

Section 3: Nutrition Standards for Competitive and Other Foods and Beverages 

77

54

Section 4: Physical Education Physical Activity 

81

50

Section 5: Wellness Promotion and Marketing 

75

50

Section 6: Implementation, Evaluation, and Communication 

88

75

OVERALL DISTRICT POLICY SCORE: 

87

57


OTHER WELLNESS INITIATIVES, RECOGNITIONS, & SUCCESSES 

HCPS is committed to creating a healthy school culture and supporting our students’ health and well-being. Some of our successes from the past few years are listed below: 

  • HCPS was awarded grants by the Virginia Department of Health that were used to purchase WELNET, a software system that supports Health & Physical Education teachers and programs in collecting and communicating student fitness data. Portions of the funds were also used to provide professional development for all of our Health & Physical Education teachers, to obtain additional modules from WELNET, and to provide some new equipment for use in our Physical Education classrooms. 
  • HCPS partnered with Henry County-Martinsville 4-H Extension Office to provide LifeSkills training to students in 6th and 7th grades.
  • HCPS partnered with SOVAH Health of Martinsville for two years to provide a wellness incentive for HCPS employees. A monetary bonus was provided to HCPS employees who participated in wellness screenings and achieved either a weight loss goal or maintained a healthy weight for the duration of the program.  
  • Monthly staff newsletters are shared with HCPS employees that include healthy recipes, information related to mental wellness, recommendations for maintaining an active lifestyle, and other wellness challenges.
  • COVID Vaccination Clinics were provided for staff and students.
  • Water bottle filling stations have been placed in all of our schools. 
  • HCPS operates Mobile Breakfast carts and Grab ‘n’ Go Breakfast to encourage students to begin each school day with a nutritious meal. 
  • Nutrition workers worked tirelessly to provide students with healthy meals throughout the pandemic.

PREPARATION OF THIS REPORT & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

This report was written by Sue Townes, Curriculum Coordinator, and reviewed by members of the Wellness Committee as well as the Director of School Nutrition, Marci Lexa. For additional information, please contact Dr. David Scott, Assistant Superintendent of Operations at 276-634-4700 or dscott@henry.k12.va.us